FURRY PETS ‘ENRICH’ GUT BACTERIA OF INFANTS AT RISK FOR ALLERGIES

Sadly, a lot of expecting parents will give away their beloved pet in fear that it will cause allergy symptoms in their newborn. However, new research is saying: hold on a second!

Check out the latest study on the importance of gut bacteria.

“In a small initial study conducted by PhD researchers and doctors of Finland’s University of Turku, child and pet comingling increases the likelihood of animal gut bacteria transfer, which will then help increase the immunity of the child against different types of allergens, including pet dander.

Pet dander is considered as one of the most common triggers of allergy diseases. It contains a protein from the dried saliva of dogs and cats that causes the immune system to overreact that can result to the appearance of allergy symptoms.”

 

Pet dander is considered as one of the most common triggers of allergy diseases

For the study, Dr. Merja Nermes, one of the authors, and her colleagues wanted to determine the extent of the effects of pet exposure to a child’s immune system using an ongoing probiotic study participated by pregnant women who have allergy history. Allergies are assumed to have a genetic predisposition. Children who are born to parents who have allergies are at least 50% likely to develop the condition as well.

Among the pool of participants, they selected 51 women with infants and pets and 64 who have babies but no pets to serve as the control group.

The babies in both groups underwent two types of tests at different times. When they were one month, their DNA was tested for presence of the animal gut bacteria, specifically B. pseudolongnum and B thermophium, using the fecal sample from diapers. When analyzed, 33% of the first group had tested positive of the bacteria while around 14% of the control group had them, although it’s unclear how they had obtained the bacteria.

When they turned half year, the researchers conducted a skin prick test to find out which allergies the babies are prone to. More than 15 of the babies had allergic reactions, but for those with B. thermophilum, they didn’t have any.” – youthhealthmag.com

Rodney HabibĀ